Tuesday Tip(s): Beans, Kale & Saute Onions

Things have been crazy for us here on the farm.  We’re in the middle of finishing our house and if anyone has any experience with this, you know how chaotic things can get towards the end!  Last minute changes, plumbing, unexpected surprises, and Moroccan-style tiling has our house upside down, full of loud banging, flying cement, plaster and curious cats (just the cement and plaster are flying, the cats are safely on the ground – most of the time).

Long story short, I’ve been too busy to write a new post but here are 3 quick cooking techniques that have revolutionized my health.

1. Raw tenderized kale

One of my absolute favorite dishes that I never get tired of, here’s a great 25 second video that shows you how to do this.

**Since tenderized kale shrinks down significantly and processed fats (in this case olive oil) should be kept to a minimum, I normally use 1 tsp. per 1 to 2 servings.  2 tablespoons for the the amount of kale used in the video is way too much but this technique is an invaluable one!!

2. Saute onions… in water??!

Yes, it’s doable and delicious.  Maybe you don’t want to do this for a decadent weekend meal but this is an easy way to improve you and your family’s health daily without compromising on taste.

** This video from Jane Thompson starts the saute with a little bit of water in the very beginning while I personally start with a hot dry pan and wait until the onions begin to stick.  I think both ways work and it’s something you can easily experiment with.  The secret is to use very very little water.

3. How to boil perfect beans

I’ve tried A lot of recipes to get the perfect beans and this way has never failed me.  Of course cooking time depends on the type of bean and how old they are but this is the only thing that varies in this perfect how-to.  You can read the entire article here from The Kitchn.

** Number 5 is key to your success!

{Photo courtesy from The Kitchn's How to Cook Beans on the Stove}

{Photo courtesy from The Kitchn’s How to Cook Beans on the Stove}

Instructions

1. Soak the beans overnight. The night before you plan to cook (10-14 hours), soak the beans to reduce cooking time and help them cook more evenly. Empty the dry beans in a bowl. Pick through the beans and discard any shriveled or unappealing beans. Cover the beans with a few inches of water and leave them on the counter.

2. Drain the soaked beans. The next day, the beans will have absorbed much of the water and nearly doubled in size. Drain the beans from their soaking water and rinse them gently under water.

3. Transfer beans to a cooking pot. Transfer the beans to a Dutch oven or other heavy cooking pot. Add the aromatics, if using.

4. Bring the beans to a boil. Cover the beans with an inch of water. Bring them to a boil over medium-high heat.

5. Reduce to a simmer and cook. Once boiling, reduce the heat to low and bring the beans to a very gentle simmer. You should barely see the water moving. Leave the lid off for firm beans meant for cold salads and pasta dishes. Cover the pot with the lid slightly ajar for creamier beans for soups, casseroles, and burritos. (Learn More: Leaving the Lid On Vs. Off When Cooking Beans)

6. Cook the beans. Cook the beans for one hour, and then begin checking for doneness. Depending on their age, size, and variety, beans can take anywhere from an hour to three hours to cook through. Be patient. Keep the beans a gentle simmer and taste frequently as they start to become tender. Add more water as needed to keep the beans submerged, and stir occasionally.

7. Add the salt when beans are just barely tender. When beans are tender but still too firm to enjoy eating, add the salt. Adding the salt too early can keep the beans from becoming tender. Continue simmering until the beans are as tender and creamy as you like them. Add more salt to taste.

8. Cool and store the beans. Cool the beans in their cooking liquid and transfer to refrigerator containers, still with their cooking liquid. Beans will keep for one week refrigerated or can be frozen for up to three months.

Additional Notes:

Dry vs. Canned Amounts: One pound of dry beans makes about five cups of cooked beans, equivalent to about 3 cans of canned beans.

Cooking Beans for Soup: If you intend to use your beans in a soup, it’s best to slightly undercook them here and then finish cooking them in the soup itself.

The Cooking Liquid: Don’t pour it down the drain! Unlike the slimy liquid from canned beans, this cooking liquid is full of flavor and good nutrients. Once you’ve scooped up all your beans, this liquid makes a great base for soups and quick sauces.

Let me know how these come out for you and if you guys have any tricks and tips of your own you’d like to share!  See you next Tuesday!  ;)

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Goodbye My Little Artichoke

Growing up the only artichokes I ate were marinated and came in expensive, tiny jars.  It wasn’t until I visited Morocco that I had the pleasure of enjoying the entire plant in its intimidating splendor.  Excited by the novelty of it all, I dipped the steamed leaf into a small hand painted bowl filled with crushed raw garlic, olive oil and lemon juice.  I finally reached the heart and it’s been a  lifetime love affair ever since.

IMG_4987 copy

Kids are likely to develop a preference for foods they familiarize themselves with and eating artichokes the traditional way is a fun opportunity to slow things down and get your children involved in the kitchen.  After the entire vegetable is steamed, they get to to peel, dip and nibble the flesh of each leaf and work their way down to the best part, the heart!  The whole process is an invaluable learning experience where they get to see the inside of the plant from start to finish.  This kind of ritual can become bonding moments they will cherish and take with them to adulthood :)

Artichokes’ full bodied texture and earthy, yet subtle flavor is reminiscent of eggplant and portobello mushroom.  They give substance to any dish, from paella to quinoa recipes.  Frozen artichokes are also a great option when they’re out of season since frozen produce are normally harvested at their peak (meaning higher nutritional value) and the way they are steamed and frozen does a pretty good job at keeping the nutrients.  My absolute favorite is extracting the heart from a fresh artichoke and serving it steamed with sliced avocado, lemon juice and paper thin slivers of raw garlic.   This is a simple recipe with complex, out-of-this-world flavors!  Here’s a helpful 90 second video of how  to remove an artichoke heart.

Roman Style Artichokes from 'Savoring Time in the Kitchen' blog.

Roman Style Artichokes from ‘Savoring Time in the Kitchen’ blog.

If raw garlic might be a bit overwhelming for your little one, a sprinkle of garlic powder will do the trick.  Odds are, them watching you enjoy it will pique their curiosity and  increase their odds of acquiring the delicious, spicy taste eventually.  Leading by example instead of nagging is as effective for adults as it is for children!

I know this sounds crazy, but I’m pretty sure that in another life I was Mediterranean and lived off of artichokes.  This past year I’ve been fortunate enough to live on a  fruit and vegetable farm in Morocco, so you can imagine how I felt when I discovered the farm’s blossoming artichoke field!  Everyday before sunset I would collect a couple and have fun preparing them with my husband.  Turns out adults like using their hands as well!  Working side by side in the kitchen, laughing and listening to music was the perfect way to end the day.  Since cooking needs to be done regardless; why not make it a time to nurture and bond with loved ones, instead of treating it as a chore?

The cold winter days grew longer and we were scheduled to travel during the end of artichoke season.  When we came back from our trip my heart ached just a little as I walked towards the silvery field knowing the season had passed.  To my surprise, they had left us these bittersweet parting gifts and a promise of return.

Artichoke-Flower

 

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New Beginnings: Developing Your Baby’s Palate

Thank you for visiting!  We’ve been meaning to launch this blog for quite some time now and even though I’m excited, I can’t help feeling slightly overwhelmed.  Partially because it feels like a first day at school but mostly because there is sooo much to cover and it’s all so important.

This post is dedicated to all the recently crowned parents and parents to be.  I can’t think of a better place to start than the beginning.  Luckily for you, we’ve done all the grunt work so you can focus on basking in your pregnancy glow or your new little bundle of joy.

Baby tastes what Momma tastes:  Babies growing in the womb drink ounces of amniotic fluid every single day.  The smell of amniotic fluid is affected by the food the mother eats and 90% of what we taste comes from smell.  This means that by the third trimester, your baby is also enjoying your recent garlic-on-everything craze and the tartness of your newfound love/hate relationship with kumquats.

This is also the case for breast milk.  Depending on the food, the taste of the breast milk is affected by what the mother has recently consumed.  Different foods linger for different amounts of time and a small study done in Copenhagen University also found that the timing of the flavors showing up in the breast milk varied between the mothers.  Experts theorize this transfer of taste and smell at an early age enables a smooth transition into the baby’s new environment.  What’s even more exciting is that studies suggest  the baby is likely to enjoy novel foods when the food is  introduced through the mother’s diet while breast feeding.

Developing your baby's palate Take advantage of this opportunity to encourage diversity.

Biologically, our taste buds are designed to favor salty, sugary, and fatty foods. These characteristics meant more calories and nutrients  for our ancestors at a time when food was scarce.  Plants harvested at the their peak ripeness, for example, have higher nutritional value than if you were to consume them prematurely.  Our preference for sweetness over sour is designed to encourage us to eat the sweeter, more nutrient dense fruit.  We also tend to shy away from bitter foods since bitterness can be a sign of toxicity.

Our predisposition for loving salt, sugar and fat  works perfectly for an environment with limited food.  Obviously, babies today are born into a very different environment! So… there’s no need to worry about developing the baby’s love for Ben and Jerry’s; our evolution has that covered. Take this opportunity now to increase the chances of having your baby fall in love with amazing, healthy foods,  instead of struggling to get them to enjoy them later on.  In the future, if they refuse to eat their brussels sprouts, they might be calling your bluff.

Here’s a list of some of the most nutrient dense foods with complex tastes to turn your baby into a little connoisseur:

Garlic
Onions
Ginger
Radishes
Celery
Brussels sprouts
Mustard greens
Radicchio
Cranberries
Kumquats
Turmeric
Limes
Lemons
Olives
Grapefruit
Kale

Here’s to New Beginnings :)

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References

Breastfeeding facilitates acceptance of a novel dietary flavour compound.
Hausner H, Nicklaus S, Issanchou S, Mølgaard C, Møller P.
Clin Nutr. 2010 Feb;29(1):141-8. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2009.11.007. Epub 2009 Dec 4.

Evolution’s Sweet Tooth – NYTimes.com, Published: June 5, 2012
Daniel E. Lieberman, a professor of human evolutionary biology at Harvard and author of “The Evolution of the Human Head.”

Understanding the Origin of Flavor Preferences
Julie A. Mennella and Gary K. Beauchamp

Chemical Senses.  2005 Jan; 30(Suppl 1): i242-i243.

Prenatal and Postnatal Flavor Learning by Human Infants
Julie A. Mennella, PhD, Coren P. Jagnow, MS, and Gary K. Beauchamp, PhD
Pediatrics.  2001 Jun; 107(6): E88